09
AUG
2017

Hot of the Presses: In Case You Had Any Doubt

In case you have ANY doubts about the planet warming up there are three items which follow that should alleviate any misconceptions that may still remain.  First check out this amazing 35 second graphic.  It is simply, scary.  And then the additional short two articles will provide antidotal examples that are happening right now.  

This should provide more than adequate incentive to do whatever it takes to limit the future impact that this phenomenon will create for our descendants (and us too).

 

“Death Valley has set the record for the hottest month in the Western Hemisphere, with July’s average temperature reaching 107.39 degrees Fahrenheit…The monthly average remained a hair short of the world record, set in 2015 in King Khaled Military City, Saudi Arabia: 107.44 F”

“The Alpine ski resort of Vogel, Slovenia, last week notched its first “tropical night,” marking the first time overnight temperatures have stayed above 68 degrees at 1,500 meters up the mountains.”


Watch 100 years of temperature change in 191 countries in just 35 seconds: 

bit.ly/2w3krBh

 

Death Valley shatters heat record

Death Valley has set the record for the hottest month in the Western Hemisphere, with July’s average temperature reaching 107.39 degrees Fahrenheit.That average includes all temperatures, including lows. The average daily high climbed to 119.6 F, with July 7 marking the peak: 127 F.

Sundown brought little relief. Temperatures never dropped below 89 F, and three days saw overnight lows that still topped 100 F.

The monthly average remained a hair short of the world record, set in 2015 in King Khaled Military City, Saudi Arabia: 107.44 F (Doyle Rice, USA Today, Aug. 3). — AAA

 

 

‘Lucifer’ shatters temperature records, claims lives

 

Europeans are diving into fountains and huddling under shade as the continent’s record-breaking heat wave rolls on.

The hot spell has earned the moniker “Lucifer” after causing at least two deaths, wildfires and crop damage worth more than $1 billion. The record highs are even causing gum to melt in its packaging.

In Rome, where many locals shun air conditioning as a health hazard, the heat has coincided with a meltdown in public services, including public transit. People bunch together under the narrow shade of bus stop signs as they wait for buses that arrive late or never at all.

The Alpine ski resort of Vogel, Slovenia, last week notched its first “tropical night,” marking the first time overnight temperatures have stayed above 68 degrees at 1,500 meters up the mountains.

In Romania, police have banned heavy traffic on major roads. And Polish authorities have warned of possible grid failures as the country’s electricity demand set a summer morning record Aug. 1 at 23.8 gigawatts.

Germany, Austria and Russia have meanwhile reported more mild temperatures (New York Times, Aug. 6). — AAA

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